“I never expected…”

Gaiman y yo… diablos qué bien se siente decir eso, ejem… últimamente Gaiman y yo andamos vibrando algunos temas de forma simultánea. Aquí un extracto interesante de por qué este magnífico escritor sigue apoyando al Comic Book Legal Defense Fund (CBLDF), una organización dedicada a preservar la libertad de expresión en los cómics:

When people ask me about why I support the CBLDF and what it’s for, I talk about the First Amendment, and the countries that don’t have it — places where, as you’ll learn in in this Wall Street Journal article, you can be arrested for drawing cartoons…

On a sunny May morning, six plainclothes police officers, two uniformed policemen and a trio of functionaries from the state prosecutor’s office closed in on a small apartment in Amsterdam. Their quarry: a skinny Dutch cartoonist with a rude sense of humor. Informed that he was suspected of sketching offensive drawings of Muslims and other minorities, the Dutchman surrendered without a struggle.

“I never expected the Spanish Inquisition,” recalls the cartoonist, who goes by the nom de plume Gregorius Nekschot, quoting the British comedy team Monty Python. A fan of ribald gags, he’s a caustic foe of religion, particularly Islam. The Quran, crucifixion, sexual organs and goats are among his favorite motifs.

Mr. Nekschot, whose cartoons had appeared mainly on his own Web site, spent the night in a jail cell. Police grabbed his computer, a hard drive and sketch pads. He’s been summoned for further questioning later this month by prosecutors. He hasn’t been charged with a crime, but the prosecutor’s office says he’s been under investigation for three years on suspicion that he violated a Dutch law that forbids discrimination on the basis of race, religion or sexual orientation.

If you’re offended by something, you talk about it. You make your own cartoons. You out-argue your opponents. You don’t stop them talking, or cartooning. That’s wrong. Because if you can do that to them, someone else can do that to you.

It’s why supporting freedom of speech so often involves defending the indefensible, and is, often uncomfortably, the right thing to do.

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